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China's Controversial Hong Kong Security Law


BY: Tehreem Chohan


Hong Kong has always had a major power struggle between the people and China and it’s been happening since 1997 when the state was handed to China by the British. Ever since there have been protests and riots against the communist government for trying to control the democratic territory. But there’s a new bill that has sparked more controversy and outrage and that China is trying to enforce. This new legislation will allow high security on Hong Kong residents that will be taken and sent to China for little to no crimes.


Critics are fearing that this is a new tactic for China to completely destroy the “one country, two systems” that has protected Hong Kong’s democratic way of life. Residents are now seeking refuge in allied countries such as Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia after the annunciation of the new bill. All countries have responded together stating, “China’s proposals for a new national security law for Hong Kong lies in direct conflict with its international obligations under the principles of the legally-binding, UN-registered Sino-British Joint Declaration.”


President Trump has started to eliminate special privileges for Hong Kong to pressure China to cease the bill but has quickly stopped since the territory is a major global financial center. The UK has provided extended visa rights and an easy route to citizenship for at least 3 million Hong Kong residents in the country. Canada has expressed great concern for the new law with Prime Minister Trudeau suggesting ‘constructive talks’ between both China and Hong Kong in order to deescalate the issue.


With the pandemic going on and the world in a struggling state, this is just another problem that is affecting millions of lives that have been undergoing the same situation for the last 23 years.


*All arguments made and viewpoints expressed within Youth In Politics and its nominal entities do not necessarily reflect the views of the writers or the organization as a whole.

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